The top metrics & KPIs other teams care about for SEO

SEOs care about many metrics, often the wrong ones (rankings, DA, PA, you name it, etc.). What is often forgotten are the metrics that are important for the other teams/departments within their organization. In the end, building a company isn’t just done by one company. Over the years, it’s been clear that you work with many departments simultaneously on the same effort, and often they care about your channels’ metrics. Just not always the same ones, so in this blog post, I wanted to shine some additional light on what metrics you should think about for other departments. It’s the followup to this tweet that got quite the attention, and this post gives me the ability to go a bit more into depth on the whys?

This list is likely incomplete and is using some generic names. Your organization might have different names or have additional departments that might not be covered here. Hopefully, this gives you a better insight into how to think about various departments related to SEO.

🏢 C-Level

Depending on what type of organization you work in and how broad your C-suite is, you are likely to report at some level into a COO/CMO that cares about the SEO metrics. But often in 100+ person companies, they don’t have the depth anymore to really deep dive into the SEO cases that you’re facing within an SEO team on a day-to-day basis.

Metrics:

  • Revenue, average order value (this number should in most use cases not be too much different from the performance of other channels), and the number of Transactions.
  • Sessions from organic search as an absolute number but also the percentage of total traffic. Primarily the latter as you want to keep a healthy/diverse balance for your marketing mix. Something that I blogged about before.

🛠 Product

What is Product building that you can benefit from, and how are you working with Product to prioritize the most important changes to the product to drive additional growth from organic search. No product is finished so there is always something that you can help prioritize from an SEO point-of-view.

Metrics:

  • Load time: There has been enough buzz about the importance of site speed for good reason.
  • Number of Pages per Template
  • Growth in Sessions
  • Best Performing Page Segments
  • Conversion Rate from Organic Search, etc.

Not necessarily in that order, but usually, metrics that are impacted with/by the Product organization.

💻 Engineering

Sitespeed, code velocity, sitespeed and load times. Well you get the point. It’s all about how fast the site is and how quickly you can work with an engineering team to get changes that you want fixed implemented.

Metrics:

  • Load times/site speed, traffic to specific sections of the site.
  • Velocity of tickets/items that you want Engineering to implement.

💲 Finance

Metrics that show the potential for growth and the return on investment. In the end, in many companies, Finance is the gatekeeper of money flowing in and out. They want to get a better insight into what you’re spending and how that eventually contributes to the bottom line. Providing a simple version of a P&L for SEO will likely return a happy smile if you’re able to produce that.

Metrics:

  • ROI % (how much have you spend on SEO resourcing: team, tools, other expenses for content) versus what will it return
  • Budget Spend, Returned Revenue, and future growth.

🖼  Marketing

Likely your closest allies in the ‘battle of SEO’ together with Product. Depending on the organizational structure, you probably find the SEO team itself here or in Product. So having enough impact on the metrics that your marketing team cares about is important.

📝 Content: Do you have a separate content team? They’ll likely care about the organic traffic coming to their pages, and they should care about the impact on those business metrics too. Besides that, any insight into specific keywords (volume, CTR) is always useful for a team like this to help optimize existing content.

Metrics:

  • Impact on branded search terms: sessions.
  • Increase/decline so you can measure the uplift of other brand awareness campaigns.

🧳   Sales & Business Development

At what scale are you still able to set up partnerships and does that actually fit into the scope of SEO at scale? Likely the answer is, no. That’s why you want to partner with a sales/biz dev team that can help you solidify partnerships and companies to work within your space. They have better skills and you can likely provide them meanwhile with more useful input on who to go after.

Metrics:

  • The number of big partnerships.
  • A shortlist of partners that you want them to go after, not just for dumb link building (preferably not, in my opinion). Instead, create lasting relationships that impact the industry, TAM (Total Addressable Market), and market presence.

📞  Customer Service

The better, faster, and more quickly you can answer your customers’ questions likely the better your business will thrive in today’s environment. Often this means that providing the answer directly in search (think featured snippets). You can’t just do this alone as an SEO team, you need the input from people in Customer Service, they’re the ones talking to your customers about the (mainly) negative and positive situations. The more you can support them with the metrics that they care about, the more comfortable both your lives might become.

Metrics:

  • Organic Traffic to Support related pages, the number of calls/chats that you avoid by better-optimized pages, etc.
  • The top questions that you can answer directly via featured snippets.
  • The top 100 pages on your support portal, based on organic search segmentation.

📈 Growth

When I was on the Growth team at Postmates the insane velocity that was produced there to grow faster was great to see. As SEO isn’t the fastest-growing channel often (especially not in the short-term, as I can throw 1M towards PPC tomorrow and create near-instant results) it’s important to show how it’s attributing to the mix of long and short-term initiatives of a growth team.

Metrics:

  • Growth % of the SEO channel, compared to MoM, WoW or YoY.
  • Long term contributions of growth, as lots of SEO growth is evergreen and at relatively low costs.

👩‍💻 Human Resources

Admittedly, this one is one of the most distanced departments from just SEO, but if you’re a big organization and recruiting for dozens or even hundreds or roles, how important it could be to help drive traffic to a Careers/Jobs section on a site. If that’s the case showing the importance of driving job applicants could be incredibly helpful to help understand what SEO can do for them.

Metrics:

  • The number of job applicants that applied because they found the jobs via Search.
  • Traffic to a specific segment of the site from Organic Search: Careers/Jobs.
  • The number of pages marked up properly with structured data for Jobs.

What metrics are missing? What do you measure for your organization? There are so many different business models out there that likely this list is far from complete for; for example, B2B cases are likely to be missing here.


Saving Bing Search Query Data from the Bing Webmaster Tools’ API

Over the last year, we spent a lot of time working on getting data from several marketing channels into our marketing data warehouse. The series that we did on this with the team has received lots of love from the community (thanks for that!). Retrieving Search Query data from Bing has proven to be one of the ‘harder’ data points: there is a lack of documentation, there a no real connectors directly to a data warehouse, and as it turns out the returned data (quality) is … ‘interesting’ to say the least. That’s why I wanted to write this blog post, to provide the code to easily pull out your search query data from Bing Webmaster Tools and give more people to evaluate their data. Hopefully, this provides the overall community with a better insight into the data quality coming out of the API.

Getting Started

  1. Create an account on Bing Webmaster Tools.
  2. Add & Verify a site.
  3. Create an API Key within the interface (help guide).
  4. Save the API Key and the formatted site URL.

The code

These days I spent most of my time (whenever I get to write code) coding in Python, that’s why these.

import datetime
import requests
import csv
import json
import re

URL = "https://example.com"
API_KEY = ''

request_url = "https://ssl.bing.com/webmaster/api.svc/json/GetQueryStats?apikey={}&siteUrl={}".format(API_KEY, URL)

request = requests.get(request_url)
if request.status_code == 200:
    query_data = json.loads(request.text)

    with open("bing_query_stats_{}.csv".format(datetime.date.today()), mode='w') as new_file:
        write_row = csv.writer(new_file, delimiter=',', quotechar='"')
        write_row.writerow(['AvgClickPosition', 'AvgImpressionPosition', 'Clicks', 'Impressions', 'Query', 'Created', 'Date'])

        for key in query_data["d"]:
            # Get date
            match = re.search('/Date\\((.*)\\)/', key["Date"])

            write_row.writerow([key["AvgClickPosition"] / 10,
                                key["AvgImpressionPosition"] / 10,
                                key["Clicks"],
                                key["Impressions"],
                                key["Query"],
                                datetime.datetime.now(),
                                datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(int(match.group(1)) // 1000)])

Or find the same code here in a Gist file on Github.

Steps to take

  • Make sure you have all the needed dependencies installed: json, re, requests, csv.
    • pip install requests json re csv
  • Run the script: python bing_query_stats.py and enter the API Key and Site URL in the constants at the top of the script.
  • If everything is successful the information is saved in this file: bing_query_stats_YYYY-MM-DD.csv

Data Quality

As I mentioned in the intro, the data quality is questionable and leaves very much up to the imagination. It’s one of the reasons why I wanted to share this script, so others can get their data out and we can hopefully learn more together on what the data represents. The big caveat seems that the data is exported at the time of extraction with a date range of XX days and it’s not possible to select a date range. This means that you can only make this data useful if you save it over a longer period of time and based on that calculate daily performance. This is all doable in the setup we have where we’re using Airflow to save the data into our Google BigQuery data lake, but because it isn’t as straight forward this might be harder for others.

So please share your ideas on the data and what you ran into with me via @MartijnSch


Starting & Growing SEO Teams

“Tell me, who/what do I need to hire to run our SEO program? What is the first hire for a new SEO team?” Questions I often get, usually followed by: “Do you know anybody for our team?”. As so many companies around the Bay Area are hiring it makes sense, which also makes hiring harder. I’ve previously blogged about writing a better job description for SEO roles but I also wanted to shed some light into what I’d suggest as good setups for an SEO team and what roles + seniority to hire for depending on your company structure.

Why need SEO support?

Most startup founders or early employees don’t have an extensive background in Marketing or specifically SEO (and they shouldn’t). Most of the time, they have been too busy building the company, getting to product-market fit and iterating on their product/service. In a lot of growing B2C companies, you need to establish plans for long term growth. That’s what SEO can usually bring to these companies: a sustainable long term growth strategy. But in order to get there, you’ll need to bring in extra help to make sure that it actually is sustainable. Instead of employing short term SEO tactics that might put your growth more at risk if you approach it wrong (as many startups also do).

Why create an SEO Team?

So why do you need to create an SEO team, for many of us this is common knowledge as we’re in this on a daily basis? But let’s say you’re getting started, these could be some of the objectives:

  • Dedicated focus on SEO, there are too many other channels to take care off.
  • Need to grow a long-term channel to success.
  • Too many tasks, need to specialize with its own dedicated specialized IC/team.
  • Build out more brand awareness for the company (SEO is a great way of doing this long term).
  • Grow revenue & transactions at a low Customer Acquisition Cost.

Consultant versus Hiring Inhouse

Hiring an SEO Consultant versus an Inhouse SEO

Some teams can’t always hire talent right away (think about the Bay Area where basically all the bigger companies constantly have a need to hire SEO talent) or it might take too long to ramp up SEO. In some other cases, it made more sense for the company to hire a consultant in the short term to take care of some issues and figure out what’s actually needed instead of just hiring somebody with potentially the wrong skill set for the long term.

My take on this is usually that if you already know what you want your SEO team to work on & are able to wait another 2-3 months that you’re better off hiring somebody in-house (if resources are available). In other cases: you have a short term need, you need a technical SEO but want to hire a content person, etc. You’re likely better off starting with a specialized consultant in an area to make sure your issues around that are covered.

Also, read my blogpost on levels & seniority in SEO roles.

Hiring SEOs isn’t good enough: resources!

The Skills of an SEO Leader

Provide them with resources, when I joined Postmates one of the questions that I wanted to make sure was that they provided me with not just resources to set up some tools but also that I had engineers available to run the actual implementations and a designer to create the new pages that we needed there.

  • Engineering: It’s important, as you the SEO can’t make all the changes yourself, you’ll need the team to make actual changes. Most SEOs that I meet don’t have the knowledge about their infrastructure to actually push code or design something that complies with brand guidelines.
  • Design: You need to add additional content, you need more blog posts, but they can’t just be text. There need to be visual add-ons to it, so you need design support.
  • Content: In a bigger company there will be an actual huge need for content (either new or to edit existing content). 

How have you been growing SEO teams, what is missing, what should SEO teams really focus on? Leave a comment!


Announcing my Technical SEO Course on CXL Institute

If there was one thing that I could teach people in SEO, it was always the technical side of SEO that came up first. Mostly, because I think it’s a skill that doesn’t suit too many SEOs and there is already enough (good or bad, you’ll be the judge of that) content about the international, link building or content side of SEO out there. As technical SEO is getting more and more technical and in-depth about the subject itself, I’m excited to announce that I’m launching a new technical course with the folks of CXL institute.

The course will cover everything from structured data to XML sitemaps and back to some more basic on-page optimization. Along the way, I show you my process for auditing a site and coming up with the improvements. I’ll try to teach you about as many different issues and solutions as I could think of.

It’s not going to be ‘the most complete’ course ever on this topic, technical SEO evolves quickly, and likely some things will already be outdated now it’s published, while we have worked on it for months. But I’m going to do my best to inform you here and on CXL Institute about any changes or any improvements that we might be able to make in a future version. If you have any questions about the course or want to cheer me on, reach out via Twitter on @MartijnSch.


Keyword Gap Analysis: Identifying your competitor’s keywords with opportunity (with SEMrush)

Keyword research can provide you with a lot of insights, no matter what tool you’re using they all can provide you a great deal of insight into your own performance but also that of others. But while I was doing some keyword research I thought about writing a bit more about one specific part: gap analysis. In itself an easy to understand the concept, but it can provide a skewed view of your competition (or not). To demonstrate this we’ll take a look at an actual example of some sites while using SEMrush’s data.

What does your competition look like?

You know who your competitors are right? At least your direct ones, but often people who work in SEO or the level above (Marketing/Growth) don’t always know who the actual players are. I worked in the food delivery industry, but more often than not I was facing more competition from totally random sites or some big ones than our competitors (for good reason). So it’s important to know what your overlap is in the search rankings (it’s one of the reasons you should actually be tracking rankings, but that’s a topic for another day) with other sites. This way you know what competitors are rising/declining in your space and what you can learn from their strategies to apply to your own site. But this is exactly where the caveat is, is that actually the case!?

So let’s look at an example, as you can see in this screenshot from SEMrush the playing field for Site A is quite large. They’re ‘ranking’ for tens of thousands of keywords and are placing in a decently sized industry. While they’re ahead of their competition it’s also clear that there are some ‘competitors’ in the space that are behind them in search visibility.

So let’s take the next competitor, we’ll call them ‘Competitor A’. What we see here is that they rank for 250.000 keywords. A significant number still, compared to what we’re ranking for. It doesn’t mean though that all their keywords are what we’re ranking for. So let’s dive into gap analysis.

Keyword Gap Analysis

In short, there are three ways to look at keyword analysis:

  • What keywords am I ranking for, that my competitor is also ranking for (overlap)?
  • What keywords am I ranking for, that my competitor is not ranking for (competitive advantage)?
  • What keywords am I not ranking for, that my competitor is ranking for (opportunity)?

Today we’ll only talk about the last one, what keywords could I be ranking for, as my competitor is already ranking for them, to drive more growth. When using SEMrush you can do this by creating a report like this (within the Keyword Gap Analysis feature):

Screenshot of: Creating a keyword gap analysis report in SEMrush

You always have the three options available to select. In this case, we’ll do the Common Keywords Option. And the result that we should see looks something like this:

Screenshot of the result, with a list of keywords.

What are the keywords with actual opportunity?

So there is apparently xx.xxx keywords that I’m not ranking for (and likely should). That’s significant and almost leads me to believe that we’re not doing a good job. So what the problem often is, which is not a bad thing. Is that the majority of these keywords are being driven by the long tail (specific queries with very low volume). So what ends up happening is that I’m likely looking at tons of keywords that I don’t want to focus on (and hopefully will benefit from by just creating a little bit more generic good content). So when I did this for a competitor and filtered down on keywords that were for them at least ranking position <20 and had a volume >10 monthly I had only 2500 keywords left. That’s just a few % of the keywords that we got started with. It’s required to add that I’m not saying to ignore the other keywords, but now you have the keywords that you have a real opportunity to drive actual results. In the end, you should be able to rank well, as your competitor is already ranking (position: <20), there is actual volume (>10) and you’re not in there at all.

This is just something that I was playing with while exploring some industries, and it’s a topic that I haven’t seen a lot of content about over the last years. While the data is often available it will both help you get new content ideas but also helps you identify the actual value (keyword volume should turn into business results: impressions x CTR x Conversion Rate == $$$) on the revenue side.