Tools

Over the past years I’ve built a few tools that I’d like to highlight here. I heavily believe in innovation in the marketing industry and am also a huge fan of open sourcing code. That’s why most of the ‘fun’ projects I worked on can be found on Github.
I’d like to highlight some of them on this page as they might be useful to you, as either a market, web analyst, tag management guru or SEO.

Google Analytics & Google Tag Manager

Being a huge web analytics & tag management geek while using the Google tools, me and Simon Vreeman created a couple of tools. If you care just as much about GTM & GA you might love them:

A/B Testing with Google Tag Manager

We love A/B testing at The Next Web and found out that Google Tag Manager can be really useful as the tool of your choice. By using a Tag page and selecting the pages you want to run your test on can be very helpful through Triggers. Want to know more, check this out.

Google Analytics container: The Next Web

As we love Google Tag Manager even more, we thought we could do our best in innovating with both Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager and provide some examples of what we think would be a great set up for a Tag Management container. That’s why we open sourced parts of the container that we use(d) at The Next Web. Want to use it? Check it out here.

Ruby

During my time at Springest, I got to learn coding in Ruby and used Ruby on Rails mostly as the MVC framework. This has made me work mostly in Ruby for most of the side projects. Some of the gems that I created to talk to some cool APIs are:

Google Analytics API V3 – Ruby Gem

Originally started by Chris Le, I took over the maintenance of the Google Analytics Ruby gem in 2013, maintaining it until V4 was released end 2016. Currently it still works. Maybe a V4 version of this plugin might come out one day. For now, check out the API V3 version here.

Optimizely REST API – Ruby Gem

You can find more information about the Optimizely REST API Rub gem here.

Want to help?

As you’ve noticed all my projects around the tools can be found on Github and are open for forking or contributions. If you think you can add a useful addition or have a nice suggestion on what to add, leave it there! If you have any ideas about future tools that you’d like to see or would like to partner up around a project, let me know!