Category: SEO

Finding & Dealing with Related Keywords

Finding & Dealing with Related Keywords

How do you go from 1 keyword and find another 10.000 that might also be relevant to your business/site. One of the things that I’ve been thinking about and worked on for some sites recently. It’s fun as with smaller sites it makes it easy to get more insights into what an estimated size can be of an industry/niche that a company operates in. This ain’t rocket science and hopefully after this blog posts you’ll get some new ideas on how to deal with this.

How to get started?

Pick 1 keyword, preferably short-head: coffee mug, black rug, tesla roadster. They’re keywords that can create a good start for your keyword research as they’re more generic. In the research itself we’ll talk about ways to get more insights into the long tail based on this 1 keyword.

From 1 to 10.000

Start finding related keywords for the keyword(s) you picked that you consider relevant. Use the tools that we’re going to talk about after this and repeat the process for all the keywords that you get back after the first run: 1 = 100 results = 10.000 results. Depending on the industry/niche that you operate in you might be able to find even more keywords using this method. When I started doing research for a coffee brand within 30 mins I ended up with data for 3 big niches within that space and over 25k keywords.

What tools are out there?

Obviously you can’t do this without any tools. For my own research I use the tools that are listed beneath. They’re a mix of different tools but they have the same output eventually. Getting to know more keywords but at the same time also get different input on intent. Focused on search (I’m looking for.. {topic_name}) and other search intent (I have a question around {topic_name}).

Besides the tools that I’ve listed there are many more that you could be using that I want you to benefit from:

    • Google Adwords Keyword Tool: The best source for related keywords by a keyword.
    • SEMRush: The second best source likely as they’re using all sorts of ways to figure out what keywords are related to each other. Also a big database of keywords.
    • AnswerThePublic: Depending on why/what/where/who you’re looking for AnswersThePublic can help you find keywords that are related to a user question.

Suggested searches:

    • Google, Bing, Yahoo: The biggest search engines in the world are all using different ways to calculate related searches through their suggest. So they’re all worth looking into.
    • Google Trends: Is a keyword trending or not and what keywords are related to a trending topic. Mostly useful when you’re going after topics that might have (had) some popularity.
    • YouTube: Everything video related, need I say more.
    • Wikipedia: You really are looking for some in depth information in the topic, WikiPedia can likely tell you more about the topic and the related topics that are out there.
    • Instagram: Everything related to pictures and keywords, their hashtags might mislead you from time to time.
    • Reddit: The weirdest place to find keywords and topics.
    • Quora: Users have questions, you can answer them. The most popular questions on Quora on a topic are usually the biggest questions on your customers minds too.
    • Yahoo Answers: Depending on the keyword the data can be a bit old, who still uses Yahoo? But it can be useful to get the real hardcore keywords with a question intent.
    • Synonyms: The easiest relevance, find the keywords that have the same intention.
    • Amazon: Find keywords that people are using in a more transactional intent and that you might search for when you’re looking for a product. Great for ecommerce.

Grouping Keywords

When you’ve found your related keyword data set it’s time for the second phase, grouping them together. In the end 1 keyword never comes alone and there is a ton you can do with them if you group them together in a way that makes sense for you….

By name/relevance/topical: Doing this at scale is hard, but I’m pretty sure that you see the similarity between the keywords: coffee mug and: black coffee mug. In both ‘coffee mug’ is the keyword that is overlapping (bigram). If you start splitting up keywords with different words relatively fast you’re able to find the top words and word combinations that your audience is using most.

By keyword volume: If you have the right setup you can retrieve the keyword volumes for all of these keywords and start bucketing the keywords together based on short-head and long tail. This will enable you to get better insights into the total size of the volume in your industry/niche.

By ranking/ aka opportunity: It would be great if you can combine your keywords with data from rankings. So you know what opportunity is and for what words you’re still missing out on some additional search volume.

What’s next?

Did you read the last part? What if you would start combining all three ways of grouping them? In that case you’ll get more insights into the opportunity, your current position in the group and what kind of topical content you should be serving your audience. Food for thought for future blog posts around this topic.

Using Keyword Rankings In SEO

A few weeks ago I gave a talk at an SEO Meetup in San Francisco. It was a great opportunity to get some more feedback on a product/tool that I’m working on (and that we are already using at Postmates). You’ll hear more on this in the upcoming months (hopefully). In a previous blog post at TNW I talked about using dozens of GBs of data to get better insights in search performance. Over the last years I kept working on the actual code around this to also provide myself with more insights into the world around a set of keywords.

Because billions of searches are done on a daily basis and ~20% of queries haven’t been searched for in the past 30-90 days it means that there is always something new to find out. I’m on the hunt to explore these new keyword areas/segment & opportunities as fast as possible to get an idea on how important they can be.

That means two things:

  1. The keyword might be absolutely new and has never been searched for.
  2. The keyword has never come up on the radar of the company, it was never a related keyword or never got an impression simply because content didn’t rank for it.

Usually the next thing you want to know is what their ranking is so you can start improving on it, obviously that can be done in thousands of ways. But hopefully the process would usually work something like this. Moving up from an insane ranking (read: nowhere to be found) to the first position within a dozen weeks (don’t we all wish that can happen in that amount of time?).

Obviously what you’re looking for is hopefully a graph for a keyword that will look something like this:

What am I talking about?

Back at TNW my team was tracking 30.000 keywords on a weekly basis to get better insights into what was happening with our search volume & our rankings. It has multiple benefits:

  1. Get insights into your own performance for specific keywords.
  2. Get insights in your actual performance in search engines (are 100 keywords increasing/stable/decreasing?).
  3. Get insights into your competitors performance.

Besides that there is a great opportunity to learn more about the flux/delta of changes in the search results. You’re likely familiar with Mozcast & SERPMetrics Flux and other ‘weather’ radars that monitor the flux in rankings for tons of keywords to see what is changing and if they’re noticing an update. With your own toolset you’ll be able to get insights into that immediately. I started thinking about this whole concept years ago after this Mozcon talk from Martin McDonald in 2013. One of the things that are particularly interesting:

Share of Voice

You’ve also likely heard of the concept of Share of Voice in search. In this case we’re talking about it in the concept of rankings. If you rank #100 in the search results, you’ll get 1 point. If you’ll rank #1 you would assign it 100 points. Which basically means that you will get more points the higher you’ll rank. If you bundle all the keywords together, let’s say 100 you can get: 100 x 100 = 10.000 in total. Over time this will help you to see how a lot of rankings will be influenced and where you’re growing instead of being focused on just the rankings of 1 keyword (always a bad idea in my opinion).

In addition to measuring this for yourself, there will also be other useful ways you can use Share of Voice:

  • Who are my competitors: Obviously you know your direct competitors, but most of the times that doesn’t mean that they’re the same as you’re going against in search results. Get the top 10-20-50-100 (whatever works for you) and count the URLs for the same domain in all of the keywords in a group and multiply that by their Share of Voice. The ones that raise to the top will be the competitors that are annoying you most.
  • Competitors: You’re familiar now with the concept, so if you apply the same thing to your competitors you’re able to figure out how they’re growing compared to you and what their coverage is in search for a set of keywords. Basically providing you with the data you otherwise would have to dig up somewhere else.

How can you combine it with other data sets?

In a future blog posts I’m hoping to tell you more about how to do the actual work to connect your data to other sets in order for it to make sense. But the heading I’m going for right now is to also look more at competitors/ or at least other people in the same space. There is probably a big overlap with them but there also will be a lot of keywords missing.

What’s next?

I’m nearing the end of the first alpha version to use, it will enable users to track their rankings wherever they want. Don’t dozens of tools already do that? Yes! I’m just trying to make the process more useful for bigger companies and provide users with more opportunities to expand their keyword arsenal. All with the goal to increase innovation in this space and to lower costs. It doesn’t have to be expensive to track thousands of keywords whenever you want.

Measuring SEO Progress: From Start to Finish – Part 2: From Creation to Getting Links

Measuring SEO Progress: From Start to Finish – Part 2: From Creation to Getting Links

How to measure (and over time forecast) the impact of features that you’re building for SEO and how to measure this from start to finish. In this series I already provided some more information on how to measure progress: from creation to traffic (part 1). This blog post (part 2) will go deeper into another aspect of SEO: getting more links and how you can measure the impact of that. We’ll go a bit more into depth on how you can easily (through 4 steps, 1 bonus step) get insights into the links that you’ve acquired and how to measure their impact.

1. Launch

You’ve spent a lot of time writing a new article or working on a new feature/product with your team, so the last thing you want is not to receive search traffic for it and not start ranking. For most keywords you’ll need to do some additional authority building to make sure you’ll get the love that you might be needing. But it’s going to be important to keep track of what’s happening around that to measure the impact of your links on your organic search traffic.

2. Monitor

So the first thing you’d like to know if your new page is getting any links, there are multiple ways to track this. For this you can use the regular link research tools, that we’ll talk about more in depth later in this piece. But one of the easiest ways for a link to show real impact is to figure out if you’re receiving traffic from it and when that time was. Just simple and easy to figure out in Google Analytics. Head to the traffic sources report and see for that specific page if you’re getting any referral traffic. Is that the case? Then try to figure out when the first visit was, you’ll be able to monitor more closely then since when you’ll have this link or look at the obvious thing, the published date if you can find it.

How to measure success?

Google Alerts, Mention, Just-Discovered Links (Moz) and as described Google Analytics. They’re are all tools that can be used to identify links that are coming in and might be relatively new. As they’re mentions in the news media or just the newest being picked up by a crawler. It’s important to know more about that as you don’t’ want to be dependent on a link index that is updating on an irregular basis.

3. Analyze

Over a longer period of time you want to know how your authority through links is increasing. While I’m not a huge fan of the ‘core metrics’ like Domain Authority, Page Authority, etc. as they can change without providing any context I rather look at the graphs and new and incoming root domains to see how fast that is growing. In the end it is a numbers game (usually more quality + quantity) so that’s the best way to see it. One of my favorite reports in Majestic is the cumulated links + domains so I can get an easy grasp of what’s happening. Are you rapidly growing up and to the right or is progress slow?

How to measure success?

One suggestion that I would have is to look at the cached pages for your links: So by now you’ve figured out what kind of links are sending traffic, so that’s a good first sign. But are they also providing any value for your SEO? Put the actual link into Google and see if the page is being indexed + cached. It is? Good for you, that means the page is of good enough quality and being cached for Google’s sake. It’s not, hmm then there is work to do for no and your actual page might need some authority boosting on its own.

4. Impact

Are you links really impacting what’s happening to the authority and ranking of the page. You would probably want to know. It’s one of the harder tasks to figure out as you have a lot of variables that can be playing a role in this. It’s basically a combination of the value of these links, which you could use one of the link research tools’ metrics for or just looking at the actual changes for search traffic for your landing page. Do you see any changes there?

5. Collect all the Links

In addition to getting insights into what kind of links might be impacting your rankings for a page you’ll likely want to know where all of your links can be find. That’s relatively simple, it’s just a matter of connecting all the tools together and using them in the most efficient way.

So sign up for at least the first three tools, as Google Search Console and Bing Webmaster Tools are free, you can use them to download your link profiles. When you sign up for Majestic you’re able to verify your account with your GSC account and get access to your own data when you connect your properties. So you just unlocked three ways of getting more data.

That’s still not enough? Think about getting a (paid) account at three other services so you can download their data and combine it with the previous data sets, you’re not going to be able to retrieve much more data and get a better overview as you’re now leveraging 6 different indexes.

(P.S. Take notice that all of them grow their indexes over time, a growing link profile might not always mean that you’re getting more links, it might be that they’re just getting better at finding them.)

How to measure success?

Download all the data on a regular basis (weekly, monthly, quarterly) and combine the data sets, as they’re all providing links and root domains you can easily add the sheets together and remove the duplicate values. You won’t have all the metrics per domain + link that way but still can get a pretty good insight into what your most popular linking root domains + links are.
In the previous part I talked more about measuring the impact from creation to getting traffic. Hopefully the next part will provide more information on how to measure business impact & potentially use the data for forecasting. In the end when you merge all these different areas you should be able to measure impact in any stage independently. What steps did I miss in this analysis and could use some more clarification?

Measuring SEO Progress: From Start to Finish – Part 1: Receiving Traffic

Measuring SEO Progress: From Start to Finish – Part 1: Receiving Traffic

How to measure (and over time forecast) the impact of features that you’re building for SEO and how to measure this from start to finish. A topic that I’ve been thinking about a lot for the last few months is. It’s hard, as most of the actual work that we do can’t be measured easily or directly correlated to results. It requires a lot of resources and mostly a lot of investment (time + money). After having a discussion about this on Twitter with Dawn Anderson, Dr. Pete and Pedro Dias I thought it would be time to write up some more ideas on how to get better at measuring SEO progress and see the impact of what you’re doing. What can you do to safely assume that the right things are impacted.

1. Create

You’ve spent a lot of time writing a new article or working on a new feature/product with your team, so the last thing you want is not to receive search traffic for it. Let’s walk through the steps to get your new pages in the search engines and look at the ways you can ‘measure’ success at every step.

2. Submit: to the Index and/or Sitemaps

The first thing you want that you can impact is making sure that your pages are being crawled, in the hope that right after they’ll be indexed. There’s a different way to do this, you can either submit them through Google Search Console to have them fetched, beg that this form still works, or list your pages in a sitemap and submit these through Google Search Console.

Want to go ‘advanced’ (#sarcasm)? you can even ping search engines for new updates to your sitemaps or use something like Pubsubhubbub to notify other sources as well to know there is new content or pages.

How to measure success? Have you successfully submitted your URL via the various steps. Then you’ve basically completed this step. For now there’s not much more you can do.

3. Crawled?

This is your first real test, as submitting your page doesn’t even mean these days that your page will be crawled. So you want to make sure that after you submit the page is being seen by Google. After they’ve done this they can evaluate if they find it ‘good enough’ to index it. Before this step you mostly want to make sure that you, indeed, made the best page ever for users.
How to measure success? This is one of the hardest steps as most of the time (at least for bigger sites) you’ll need access to the server logs to figure out what kind of URLs have been visited by a search engine (User Agent). What do you see for example in the following snippet:

30.56.91.72 - - [06/Sep/2017:22:23:56 +0100] "GET" - "/example-folder/index.php" - "200" "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Googlebot/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)" - www.example.com

It’s a visit to the hostname: www.example, on the specific path: /example-folder/index.php, which returned a 200 status code (successful) at September 6th. And the User Agent contained Googlebot. If you’re able to filter down on all of this data in your server logs, you can identify what pages are being crawled and which not over a period of time.

4. Indexed: Can the URL be found in the Index?

Like I mentioned before, a search engine crawling your page doesn’t mean at all that it’s a guarantee that it will also be indexed. Having worked with a lot of sites with pages that are close to duplicate it shows the risk that they might not be indexed. But how do you know and what you can do to evaluate what’s happening?
How to measure success? There are two very easy ways, manual: just put the URL in a Google Search and see if the actual page will come up. If you want to do this at a higher scale look at sitemaps indexed data in Google Search Console to see what percentage of pages (if you’re dealing with template pages) is being indexed. The success factor, when your page shows up. It means that it’s getting ready to start ranking (higher).

5. First Traffic & Start Ranking

It’s time to start achieving results, the next steps after making sure that your site is indexed is to start achieving rankings. As a better ranking will help you get more visits (even on niche keywords). In this blog posts I won’t go into what you can do to get better rankings as there have been written too many blog posts already about this topic.

How to measure success? Read this blog post from Peter O’Neill (Mr. MeasureCamp) on what kind of tracking he added to measure the first visits from Organic Search coming. This is one of the best ways I know for now, as it will also allow you to retrieve this data via the Google Analytics Reporting API making it easier to automate reporting on this.

As an alternative you can use Google Search Console and filter down on the Page. So you’re only looking at the data for a specific landing page. Based on that you can see over time how search impressions + clicks have been growing and when (only requirement is that you should have clicks in the first 90 days of launch of this page, but you’re a good SEO so capable of achieving that).

6. Increase Ranking

In the last step we looked at when you received your first impression. But Google Search Console can also tell you more about the position for a keyword. This is important to know to make sure that you can still increase your efforts or not to get more traffic in certain areas.

In some cases it means that you can still improve your CTR% by optimizing the snippet in Google. For some keywords it might mean that you hit your limit, for other it might mean that you can still increase your position by a lot.

How to measure success? Look at the same report, Search Analytics, that we just looked for the first visit of a keyword. By enabling the data for the Impressions you can monitor what you rankings are doing. In this example you see that the rankings are fluctuating on a daily basis between 1-3. When you’re able to save the data on this over time you can start tracking rankings in a more efficient way.

Note: To do this efficiently you want to filter down on the right country, dates, search type and devices as well. Otherwise you might be looking into data from other countries, devices, etc. that you’re not interested in. For example, I don’t care right now about search outside of the US, I probably rank lower and so they could drop my averages (significantly).

As Google Search Console only shows the data on a 90 day basis I would recommend saving the data (export CSV). In a previous blog post I wrote during my time at TNW I explained how to do this at scale via the API. As you’re monitoring more keywords over time this is usually the best way to go.

7. First Positions

In the last step I briefly mentioned that there is still work to be done when you’re ranking for a specific keyword when you’re in position 1. You can still optimize your snippet usually for a higher CTR%. They’re the easier tasks in optimization I’ve noticed over time. Although at scale it could be time consuming. But how do you find all these keywords.

Keyword Rankings

I still believe in keyword rankings, definitely when you know what locations you’re focusing on (on a city, zipcode or state level) you’re able these days to still focus on measuring the actual SERPs via many tools out there (I’m still working on something cool, bear with me for a while until I can release it). The results in these reports can tell you a lot about where you’re improving and if you’re already hitting the first positions in the results.

How to measure success? You stay in the same report as you were in before. Make sure that you’ve segmented your results for the right date range and that you segmented on the right device, page, country or search type that you want to be covered in. Export your data and filter or sort the column for position on getting the ones where position == 1. These are the keywords that you might want to stop optimizing for.
What steps did I miss in this analysis and could use some more clarification?
In the next part of this series I would like to take a next step and see how we can measure the impact from start to finish for links, followed by part three on how to measure conversions and measure business metrics (the metrics that should really matter). In the end when you merge all these different areas you should be able to measure impact in any stage independently.

From 99% ‘duplicate content’ to 15 editors and back to ‘duplicate content’

Duplicate content is (according to questions from new SEOs and people in online marketing) still one of the biggest issues in Search Engine Optimization. I’ve got news for you, it for sure isn’t as there are plenty of other issues. But somehow it still always comes up to the surface when talking about SEO. As I’ve been on both sides of the equation, having worked for comparison sites and a publisher I want to reflect on both angles. Why I think it’s really important that you see both sides of the picture when looking into why sites could have duplicate content and if they do it on purpose or not.

When I started in SEO about 1211 years ago I worked for a company who would list courses from all around the globe on their website (Springest.com, let’s give them some credit), making it possible for people to compare them. By doing this we were able to create a really useful overview of training courses on the subject of SEO for example. One downside of this was that basically none of the content we had on our site was unique. Training courses are often a very strict program and in certain cases are regulated by the government of institutions to provide the right qualification to attendees. Making it impossible to change any of the descriptions on contents, books or requirements as they were provided by the institutions (read: copy pasted)

Having worked at the complete other side with The Next Web where I had the privilege of working with 10-15 full-time editors all around the globe who write unique, fresh and (news) content on a daily basis. Backed up by dozens of people willing to write for TNW where are presented with the opportunity to chose what kind of posts we publish. It made some things easier, but even at TNW we ran into content issues. The tone of voice over time devalues/changes as editors come and go. But also when you publish more content from guest authors it’s hard to maintain the right balance.

These days I’m ‘back’ with duplicated content, working at Postmates where we work on on-demand delivery. Now it makes it easier to deal with the duplicate content that we technically have from all of the restaurants (it’s published on their own site and on some competitors). But with previous experience it’s way easier to come up with so many more ideas based on the (duplicate) content that you already have. It also made me realize that most of the time you’re always working with something that is duplicate, either it be the product info you have in ecommerce, the industry that you operate in. It’s all about the way you slice and dice it to make it more unique.

In the end, search engine optimization is all about content. Either duplicated or not. We all want to make the best of it and there is always a way to provide a unique angle. Although the angle of the businesses and the way of doing SEO for them is completely different there are certain skills required that I think could provide you with a benefit over a lot of people when you’ve worked with both.